tiny muscles

Tonight Bryan was throwing Annie and Paul into the air, making them shriek with delight. During Paul’s turn, Annie appealed to me: “Mom, can you throw me?” I told her sorry, I wasn’t as strong as Dad. She said, “Your muscles are just very tiny?”

IMG_20171108_181922

News to us: she knows the word muscles; she knows they are related to strength; she knows strength is what it takes to throw her into the air; she is able to integrate all of this knowledge into an insult.

can i see it?

We do a lot of talking about what we see during our daily 60-90 minutes in the car. Cars, trucks, red lights, green lights, blinking lights, the highway, the regular street, cranes, cranes turning around, buildings, birds, bikes, people, the letters A and P—if it exists in downtown Austin, we’ve probably talked about it. It’s a way to pass the time that feels at least minimally engaged with the kids and mentally stimulating, which assuages some of our guilt for subjecting them to a daily commute strapped down in carseats.

Right now, though, when we point out a feature of interest (look, there’s a firetruck!), Annie starts chirping the first question that has truly stumped us as parents:

Can I see it?

Can I see it?

Can I see it?

Can I see it?

Look out your window, it’s right there!

Can I see it?

Can I see it?

Can I see it?

Can I see it?

Well, no, we passed it now.

Can I see it?

Can I see it?

Can I see it?

Can I see it?

Uh, hey, look now—it’s a school bus!

Can I see it?

Can I see it?

Can I see it?

Can I see it?

I don’t know, Annie, can you? I’m not sure what you can see.

Can I see it?

Can I see it?

Can I see it?

Can I see it?

I can’t see out of your eyes, Annie, I don’t know if you can see it. It’s right there! LOOK RIGHT THERE.

Can I see it?

Can I see it?

Can I see it?

Can I see it?

 

Can I see it?

Can I see it?

Can I see it?

Can I see it?

 

So far we have managed not to drive the car into the river.

Aside

future

On the way home today, Annie declared, “The CARS have no PEOPLE. THERE’S NO PEOPLE.” She likes to make test statements about the world and accepts corrections gracefully. It’s not a bad way to learn. So I explained: the cars on the road DO have people in them because a person has to drive. As I was saying it, I was realizing that by the time she’s driving, this will probably be wrong.